How to identify and eat Chickweed (stellaria media) recipe

Chickweed appears in the weed section of garden guides and government publications.  It is often one of the first plants that gardeners attempt to drive out of their garden.  But wait!  Don’t toss that chickweed on the weed pile.  Rather bring it to the kitchen and toss it in the skillet.  Chickweed is not only one of the tastiest garden weeds, it is one of the earliest, making it’s appearance in early spring when you crave green the most.  Not only is it edible but it is an excellent medicinal plant.   I will write about the magic potions made with chickweed when I brew them later this year..

The sprawling chickweed pant shows up ealy in the garden. A welcome and tasty site of green.

Chickweed flowers early and it is a good way to identify it. The five, white, petals are deeply split

 

The taste of chickweed is okay raw but where it really shines is lightly braised.  I swear it taste just like spinach.  I tried it in an omelet but I bet it would taste great too as a pot herb or soup green.  I am still rich in greens that have over wintered in the garden like kale, claytonia and leeks.  They also play a big part in my early spring diet.

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EARLY SPRING GREENS CHICKWEED OMELET
serves 2
Big handful of chickweed
5 eggs fresh from the chickens
1/4 cup milk
1 leek pulled from the overwintered garden or an onion finely diced
1 cup of claytonia (miner’s lettuce-Montia perfoliata) from the over wintered garden
Oil or butter for frying

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Chop the leek using all parts except the roots and the wilted tips (or slice the onion fine).  Heat the oil on low and stir in the leeks/onions.  Fry for a few minutes.  Chop the chickweed into 2 inch pieces and add to the leeks.  Beat the eggs and milk together.    Combine with leeks and chickweed.  Cover and cook until just firm.  Place on a plate and garnish heavily with the claytonia

 

Chickweed on the cutting board

Chickweed on the cutting board

 

Chickweed braised

Lightly braising it with after infusing the oil with the leeks

 

Chickweed omelet on plate

On the plate-a chickweed omelet-garnished with claytonia

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About thegreenlifefarm

The Green Life Farm welcomes people who are on a path toward sustainability, increased environmental consciousness and mindfulness. We are 80% food self sufficient, off the grid for lighting, have reduced our wastes by 90% and have become more and more producers instead of consumers. The Green Life Farm is a place to meet kindred spirits and experience how it could be to reconnect with people and nature. Our farm is always open to visitors interested in alternative energy, living, thinking, building, husbandry, forestry, cooking and farming. In summer, our place is open to campers. Our names are: Bonnie and Sylvain. Calling 902-665-2084 is best because we are not online, thegreenlifefarm@gmail.com, every day. You are welcome to bring your pet. Be ready to use an outhouse! All visits include harvesting (even in winter), preparing and sharing a meal…and good discussions
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One Response to How to identify and eat Chickweed (stellaria media) recipe

  1. meansoybean says:

    Just tweeted your blog post on Twitter 🙂

    I was just tweeting about collecting dandelion heads to make an aches & sore muscles massage oil. I was thinking of chickweed (and how to identify it) while in the backyard.

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